TIGHTENING YOUR APA STYLE

APA REFERENCE STYLE: Chapters in Edited Books

Citation Style: Journals Citation Style: ERIC Docs

A book is a work that is published once, not as part of a regular series. Books can be revised and republished: each revision is considered a new edition of the same book. More specifically, an edited book is one that is divided into chapters, each of which is written by a different author or group of authors. If the work you are using is not divided up in this way, go to the page, Books.

Edited books are valuable in that the individual chapters are generally authored by specialists. Sometimes the chapters were originally published as journal articles, and are reprinted because of their enduring importance. In other cases, the editors have asked authors with differing perspectives to state their points of view on a single topic. These multiple "takes" on a single subject can be crucial in looking at a topic's broader perspective.

Be careful, though. Like the other type of book, edited books can become outdated. It is therefore important to make sure the edited books you use in your research are current and valid.

NECESSARY INFORMATION AND WHERE TO FIND IT:

Author(s) of chapter can generally be found in the table of contents and on the first page of the author's chapter
Year of publication can sometimes be found at the bottom of the title page; otherwise look on the page directly behind the title page, where it says "Copyright ©"
Title of chapter can be found in the table of contents as well as on the first page of the chapter
Editor(s) of book can generally be found on both the cover (or dust jacket) and title page.
Title of Edited book can also be found on both the cover and title page.
Edition/Revision number (if any) is usually indicated on the cover (or dust jacket) or title page. If no edition number or revision information is present on either of these places, assume that the book is an original edition
Pages of chapter are sometimes specified in the table of contents; otherwise, make a note of the first and last page numbers of the actual article
Place of publication is usually listed on the title page
Publishing entity is almost always printed at the bottom of the title page. If no listing is made here, try the page directly behind the title page


CITATION ELEMENTS

AUTHOR(S) OF CHAPTER
      For chapters of edited books, put each author's last name, then a comma, then the first initial of the first name, then any additional initials. A period should follow each initial. Separate the last author from the second-to-last author with a comma and ampersand (&). Separate any additional authors by commas. If the listed author is a group or institution, include its full name. In the case of institutional authorship, add a period to end the section; for individual authors, no extra period is needed-the period after the final initial is sufficient.

One authorGrimsby, N. D.
Two authorsTorqua, C., & Tayiba, B. A.
Three authorsRay, S. J., Bachchan, A., & Puri, A. M.
Institutional authorPublic Corporation for Pig Latin Programming.

YEAR OF PUBLICATION
      For edited books, include only the year of copyright, in parenthesis, then end with a period. If the book was republished, include the original date of publication and the new date, separated by a slash (/), in the text citation, but list only the publication date of the source used in the reference list. If no date of publication is listed, put "n.d." in the parenthesis.

Standard form(1995).
Republished book (in-text citation)(1935/1980).
No date given(n.d.).

TITLE OF CHAPTER
      Give the full title of the chapter, including the subtitle if one is given. Capitalize only the first word of the title, and the first word of any subtitle; also capitalize any proper names in the title. Separate title and subtitle with a colon (:). Chapter titles do not get any other special formatting: no quotation marks or italics. End with a period.

Standard formThree steps to better PL pronunciation.
Title and subtitleOo-gay oo-gay: A case study in acquiring Pig Latin as a first language.

EDITOR(S) OF BOOK
      Editors' names are not inverted; list the initial of each first name, then any additional initials, then each editor's last name. In the case of multiple editors, separate the last author from the second-to-last author with a comma and ampersand (&). Separate any additional editors by commas. Put "In" before the first editor and a comma after the last. Include the term "Eds." (for multiple editors) and "Ed." (without the "s") in parentheses after the last editor's name and before the comma.

One editorIn A. B. Caldwell (Ed.),
Two editorsIn D. Ellsberry, & F. G. Harrington-Iynnes (Eds.),
Three editorsIn J. K. L'oignon, M. Nalley, & O. P. Quarryman (Eds.),

TITLE OF EDITED BOOK
      The edited book title goes right after the comma that follows the editor(s). Give the full title of the book, including the subtitle if one is given. Capitalize only the first word of the title, and the first word of any subtitle; also capitalize any proper names in the title. Separate title and subtitle with a colon (:). Italicize the title and subtitle. No period goes after the title of the edited book; the page range of the cited chapter (in parentheses) and any edition or revision information directly follows the title.

Standard formStartling new data on an African PL variant
Title and subtitleLesson planning with the Pig Latin student in mind: Different strategies, different viewpoints

PAGES OF CHAPTER, EDITION/REVISION NUMBER
      Page numbers and edition/revision information (if any) are placed within parentheses, directly after the edited book's title, and followed by a period. Neither the parenthetical information, the space that precedes it, nor the period that follows it are italicized.
      To note page numbers, start with "pp." and then put the numbers of the first and last pages of the chapter, separated by a hyphen.
      If edition or revision information is included, it comes before the page numbers, and the two elements are separated by a comma. For numbered editions, use the abbreviation for the ordinal number that applies (1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc.), then add "ed." For a revised edition, use the abbreviations "Rev. ed."

Pages onlyBook title (pp. 3-133).
Pages and editionBook title (3rd ed., pp. 447-478).
Pages and revisionBook title (Rev. ed., pp. 14-56).

PLACE OF PUBLICATION
      As with all books, certain common cities of publication are included with no additional information. These include: Baltimore, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Amsterdam, Jerusalem, London, Milan, Moscow, Paris, Rome, Stockholm, Tokyo, Vienna. If the edited book was published in one of these places, simply list the city, followed by a colon (:).
      If the edited book's place of publication is any city other than those on this list, additional information is needed. For American locations, include the city and state postal abbreviation, separated by a comma. For locations outside the United States, include the city and country, separated by a comma. Follow each type of location with a colon.

Common locationsBoston:

Tokyo:

American locationTurkey Scratch, AR:
Other locationsHöbsögöl, Mongolia:

Montego Bay, Jamaica:

PUBLISHING ENTITY
      Give as much of the publisher's name as necessary to render it comprehensible. Completely spell out the names of university presses and corporations, but cut such words as Inc., Co., and Publishers from commercial publishing companies. Follow the publisher's name with a period.

Commercial pressHarper.
University pressUniversity of Monaco Press.
Corporate pressWalmart Printing Office.


CITATION FORMATS:

      Author, A. A. (1996). Title of chapter. In E. E. Editor (Ed.), Title of book (pp. first page-last page). City: Publisher.

      Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (1996). Title of chapter: Subtitle of chapter. In E. E. Editor, & F. F. Editor (Eds.), Title of book: Subtitle of book (edition, pp. first page-last page). City, ST: Publisher.

      Author, A. A., Author, B. B., & Author, C. C. (1996). Title of chapter: Subtitle of chapter. In E. E. Editor, F. F. Editor, & G. G. Editor (Eds.), Title of book: Subtitle of book (edition, pp. first page-last page). City, Country: Publisher.


EXAMPLE CITATIONS:

Chapter Example 1

Citation:      Sallei, L. T. (1995). A dynamic model of inter-generational Pig Language transmission. In R. K. Jambalaya, Creole studies (pp. 571-576). Amsterdam: Updyke.


Chapter Example 2

Citation:      Bryson, B., & Winkler, I. R. (1992). What does "oo-day" really mean?. In J. Paul, Current research on semantic competence in creolized Pig Latin (3rd ed., pp. 96-107). Lick Fork, VA: Fourchette University Press.


Chapter Example 3

Citation:      Lennon, J., McCartney, P., & Harrison, G. Q. (1978). Popular music and Pig Latin: Uhv-lay ee-may oo-day. In R. Starr, The musical Pig Latin classroom (Rev. ed., pp. 40-97). Liverpool, England: Organization of Pig Latin Musicians.
In-text Citation:(Lennon, McCartney, & Harrison, 1965/1978)


Citation Style: Journals Citation Style: ERIC Docs

Table of Contents
Citation Style: Books
List of Citation Formats
Introduction
Citation Style: Chapters
Citation Practice 1
Kinds of Sources
Citation Style: ERIC Docs
Citation Practice 2
Basic Formatting
Citation Style: Internet Docs
Further Information
Citation Style: Unpublished Sources
Citation Style: Conference Papers
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